The Literacy Exchange

Through The Literacy Exchange the CLC provides workshops and trainings led by stakeholders from across the community literacies spectrum, who will provide an introductory or enrichment opportunity for other literacy workers to gain insight into a dimension of literacy work from the standpoint in which they work.

This includes workshops on literacy research methods and methodology, writing workshops, and presentations on applied literacies programs, as well as trainings on incorporating various kinds of literature into K-12 classrooms, creating afterschool youth literacy programs, and doing adult literacy work. Workshops will be led by exemplary community literacies workers, such as literacy researchers, advocates, educators, including members of the CLC Advisory Board.

Recent Literacy Exchange workshops include two created by writer and community educator Dr. Beth Godbee of Heart. Head.Hands. Through a partnership with the Fayetteville Public Library, facilitated and sponsored by the Brown Chair, Dr. Godbee led the workshops “Planning Writing Projects” and a 3-week workshop on “Contemplative Writing.”

heart-head-hands.com

Beth Godbee

Beth Godbee

Possibilities Hub

 

The Possibilities Hub presents seminars, reading groups, or a series of talks that explore a topic through and/or about literacy to expand individual and communal capacity to understand what literacy work can be and do today. The CLC is committed to resourcing all Possibilities Hub seminars with the appropriate educational materials, space, and other resources necessary to engage in a fruitful and transformative deep conversation on the topic of choice.

Our first Possibilities Hub seminar, part of the Brown Chair’s programming for the 2022 National African American Read-In, an annual national program of the National Council of Teachers of English, “Abolitionist Study Group: Literacies Toward Freedom,” was held in Spring 2022. Co-facilitated by Dustin P. Gibson and Stephanie Keene, this 7-week seminar was devoted to utilizing various forms of literacy to examine and practice abolition. In the seminar, the 20 participants engaged topics such as the History of Prisons and Policing in the U.S.; Reform and/vs. Abolition; Queer and Black Feminist Approaches to Abolition; Disability Justice; Carceral Connections Between Psych Wards and Nursing Facilities and Abolition in Practice.

The Community Literacies Collaboratory (CLC) invites proposals for a topic and facilitator(s) of our Spring 2023 “Possibilities Hub” Literacies Seminar. The purpose of these virtual 6–8-week seminars is to create space to explore a topic through and/or about literacy that will expand individual and communal capacity to understand what literacy work can be and do today. For example, last Spring, our inaugural seminar focused on abolition and literacies and drew participants from within Arkansas and across the nation. We seek proposals on topics that feel similarly timely and that require deep exploration.  If your proposal is selected, the CLC covers the cost of a generous honoraria for facilitator(s), books and other appropriate educational materials, meeting space, and other resources necessary to engage in a fruitful and transformative deep conversation on the topic of choice. Please email us at brownlit@uark.edu if you have any questions.

Proposals should include the following:

  •  Calendar & Schedule
  •  Reading List
  •  Course Outcomes
  •  Two or More Facilitators
  •  Description of Course, 1500 words or less

Email Proposals by October 14, 2022, to brownlit@uark.edu

 

Abolitionist Study Group

A 7-week virtual seminar devoted to utilizing various forms of literacy to examine and practice abolition with facilitators Stephanie D. Keene and Dustin Gibson. 

Outside-the-Box:
Short Papers, Big Ideas

Outside-the-Box invites community literacies workers to write thought provoking, accessible, brief policy memos, reports, or essays on a timely issue within literacy learning and practice. The purpose of these papers is to provide nuanced insight into a salient issue for general audiences, creating a resource for people to use in efforts to shape literacy learning, development, and practice for the better across a wide range of contexts.

Memos and reports must be between 5-7 pages, while essays must be between 800-1500 words. If accepted and commissioned for publication, author(s) will receive an honorarium for their paper/contribution.

Proposals must be a brief email indicating what you wish to write about, why you feel it is a timely issue and what impact your insights may have on critical issues in literacy learning and practice today. Please email us at brownlit@uark.edu if you have any questions.

Proposals Due by Monday, August 29, 2022 to brownlit@uark.edu

Biennial Symposium

Join us virtually for our first biennial symposium, Tracing the Stream: The Geographies of Black Feminist Literacies, Rhetorics, and Pedagogies on October 27-29. For more information, visit www.tracingthestream.com